Canada’s Energy Leaders Commemorate Canada’s 150th Anniversary

 

Introduction

As part of its commemoration of energy in Canada’s 150th year, the Energy Council of Canada has invited Canada’s energy leaders to share their insights in a series of articles written on topics of their choice.

These articles will reflect on energy developments to date, and then provide insights on what’s ahead for energy in Canada over the next 50 years. The range of topics is unlimited – policy, technology, transformation, innovation, and collaboration to name a few.

Four new articles have just been posted.

Articles Posted to Date

Canada Day and October 18

Foreword

Graham Campbell, President, Energy Council of Canada

A National Energy Strategy: The Holy Grail of Canadian Public Policy

Dr. Robert Skinner, President of KIMACAL Energy Strategies Ltd, a private advisory service.

A New Energy Future for Canada?

Michael Cleland, Senior Fellow with the University of Ottawa’s Positive Energy Project.

Wind Energy’s Coming of Age

Robert Hornung, President, Canadian Wind Energy Association.

Five Possibilities for Energy Technology

John Barrett, President, Canadian Nuclear Association

John Stewart, Director of Policy and Research,

Canadian Nuclear Association

Disruptor or Disrupted: Canada’s Role in the Changing Global Energy Market

Elyse Allan, President, and CEO, GE Canada

Canada’s Future is Electric

Canadian Council on Renewable Electricity

Hydropower: Storied Past, Brilliant Future

Canadian Hydropower Association

 

Innovation and Energy Change by Bob Hanf, Vice Chair, World Energy Council North America Region; and Executive Vice President Stakeholder Relations and Regulatory Affairs, Emera, outlines Emera’s evolution over the past century-and-three-quarters, and its current role in helping foster transformation through generation changes, electrification, and various specific projects and initiatives. A focus on smarter electricity systems and better storage are among Emera’s efforts that are helping to bring about customer- and community-supporting energy change, while also fostering a culture of innovation in its operating areas.  

Colin Andersen, Chair, Energy Council of Canada in his article entitled Energy Past ≠ Energy Future argues that past will be only limited prologue to our energy future in a time when a “Grand Transition” is underway, driven by digitization, decarbonisation and decentralisation, and characterized by considerable disruption. Electricity in particular is poised for transformation, after a relatively static first 100 years, and regulators will be challenged to move beyond today’s siloed approaches. He closes with a call to ensure that eliminating energy poverty is a component of the change and innovation to come.

The disruption theme is also discussed in an article by two of the Energy Council’s Young Energy Professionals, Robyn Budd, KPMG, Senior Consultant, Global Infrastructure Advisory, KPMG and Ben Weir, Senior Policy Advisor, Renewables Policy Unit, Ontario Ministry of Energy. In their article entitled Mutually Assured Disruption: Change and Change alike in Canada’s Electricity Sector, the authors describe an emerging trend of reciprocal disruption affecting what are traditionally termed “disruptive actors”, in an attempt to reintroduce balance to the electricity sector. Specific examples include: net metered distributed generation, where debate continues over grid integration and valuation; and large-scale renewables, where regulators are looking for new ways to value products such as capacity and reliability. The authors express the hope that a more stable state will emerge from this mutually disruptive process, to the advantage of ratepayers and the grid.

Writing from the perspective of a large global energy company, Arne Wohlschlegel, Vice President, Power & Gas, Siemens Canada has written on Energy Transition in Canada – A Chance to Come Together.  He calls for the embrace of a zero GHG emission goal for conventional power generation, based on a diversified portfolio and balanced approach. Canada is positioned to play a growing role both as energy supplier and in global climate efforts. Electricity decarbonisation alone will not, however, be sufficient to achieve our goals, making “sector coupling” essential. Digital technologies such as 3D printing, additive manufacturing, and blockchain-enabled microgrids will also enhance efficiencies and create other new opportunities. Wohlschlegel closes with a call for collective vision, and decisive action and investment, in support of Canadian leadership in the energy transition.

 

Please have a look at the articles as they are posted here during the year. Near the end of the year, the articles will be compiled into an e-publication for ease of reference and convenient downloading.

 

We hope that you enjoy reading these articles and we welcome your feedback on the observations and forward-looking insights provided by Canada’s energy leaders.

 

Foreword         

Graham Campbell, President, Energy Council of Canada

A National Energy Strategy: The Holy Grail of Canadian Public Policy

Dr. Robert Skinner, President of KIMACAL Energy Strategies Ltd, a private advisory service.

A New Energy Future for Canada?

Michael Cleland, Senior Fellow with the University of Ottawa’s Positive Energy Project, Chair of the Board of Directors at the Canadian Energy Research Institute and a member of the Board of Directors of QUEST (Quality Urban Energy Systems of Tomorrow).

Wind Energy’s Coming of Age

Robert Hornung, President, Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA)

Five Possibilities for Energy Technology

John Barrett, President, Canadian Nuclear Association

John Stewart, Director of Policy and Research, Canadian Nuclear Association

Disruptor or Disrupted: Canada's Role in the Changing Global Energy Market

Elyse Allan, President & CEO, GE Canada and 2016 Canadian Energy Person of the Year

Canada's Future is Electric

Canadian Council on Renewable Electricity

Hydropower: Storied Past, Brilliant Future

Canadian Hydropower Association

Innovation and Energy Change

Bob Hanf, Vice Chair, World Energy Council North America Region; and Executive Vice President Stakeholder Relations and Regulatory Affairs, Emera

Energy Past ≠ Energy Future

Colin Andersen, Chair, Energy Council of Canada

Mutually Assured Disruption: Change and Change alike in Canada’s Electricity Sector

Robyn Budd, KPMG, Senior Consultant, Global Infrastructure Advisory

Ben Weir, Senior Policy Advisor, Renewables Policy Unit, Ontario Ministry of Energy 

Energy Transition in Canada – A Chance to Come Together

Arne Wohlschlegel, Vice President, Power & Gas, Siemens Canada